Who I am in nine questions suggested by Bonnie Barton

A stunning peony poppy flower obtained in the mystic hour as the sun set on the Georgia property of my 98-year-old friend.
A stunning peony poppy flower obtained in the mystic hour as the sun set on the Georgia property of my 98-year-old friend.
A stunning peony poppy obtained in the mystic hour as the sun set on the South Georgia property of my 98-year-old friend Sarah Brogdon. Photography by Jeremy Roberts
Memphis trumpeter Wayne Jackson, bassist Norbert Putnam, pianist David Briggs and guitarist Chip Young all played with Elvis.
Memphis trumpeter Wayne Jackson, bassist Norbert Putnam, pianist David Briggs and guitarist Chip Young all played with Elvis.
Standing are Memphis Horns trumpeter Wayne Jackson, bassist Norbert Putnam, and journalist Jeremy Roberts. Seated are guitarist-producer-studio owner Chip Young and keyboardist-producer David Briggs on August 18, 2012, following the “Conversations on Elvis — In the Studio” Elvis Week event at Graceland. Jackson died in 2016 and worked with Elvis Presley on the acclaimed American Sound sessions that yielded “Suspicious Minds.” Putnam joined Elvis’s session band in June 1970 in Nashville for “Elvis Country” and can be heard on most of the King of Rock ’n’ Roll’s subsequent output. Young passed away in 2014 and debuted on the 1966 “How Great Thou Art” sessions at RCA Studio B in Nashville alongside protege Scotty Moore. He later became James Burton’s studio compadre and prompted Elvis to cut the fantastic “Pledging My Love” during the Jungle Room sessions for the “Moody Blue” album. Briggs substituted for Floyd “Last Date” Cramer on the “Love Letters” single session in May 1966 at Nashville’s Studio B and so impressed Elvis that he wound up on hundreds of recordings and even concerts with the TCB Band through the superstar’s demise. Image Credit: Courtesy of Jeremy Roberts
Monkees bassist Peter Tork meets a dyed in the wool fan during a solo Shoe Suede Blues concert in Adel, Georgia, in 2011.
Monkees bassist Peter Tork meets a dyed in the wool fan during a solo Shoe Suede Blues concert in Adel, Georgia, in 2011.
Inside the lobby of Cook High School in Adel, Georgia, on November 5, 2011, a maroon tie and Indian bead necklace-sporting Peter Tork autographs memorabilia and poses for a winning photo with dyed-in-the-wool Monkees aficionado Jeremy Roberts. Tork, who succumbed to Adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2019 at age 77, was in town for a gig with his solo band Shoe Suede Blues. Tork, adept at bass, keyboards, and even French horn, wailed on lead guitar inside the school’s intimate theater. He also wrote the seminal “For Pete’s Sake” and “Can You Dig It?” I interviewed Tork a few days prior to the show. I distinctly remember it was a frigid evening, and I had been there for probably three-plus hours when the shot was taken and look pretty weary. Earlier in 2011 the Monkees, minus a then-uninterested Michael Nesmith, played on their sold-out 45th Anniversary Tour which I attended at Jacksonville’s Florida Theatre. Tork’s Monkee band mate Davy Jones would shockingly pass away a mere three months after this photo was taken of a massive heart attack. Image Credit: Courtesy of Jeremy Roberts

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Retro pop culture interviews & lovin’ someone fierce sustain this University of Georgia Master of Agricultural Leadership alum. Email: jeremylr@windstream.net

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