Uncovering resilient American soldier Audie Murphy

Five years after he was released from active duty during World War II’s European-African-Middle Eastern Theater Campaign, an astonishingly handsome 25-year-old Audie Murphy sports his Class A army captain uniform. A month after finishing location shooting for fourth starring film “Kansas Raiders” [Murphy emblazoned frontier outlaw Jesse James], America’s most decorated soldier of World War II was appointed “Captain, Infantry, Texas National Guard of the United States” on July 14, 1950, and “Captain, Infantry, National Guard of the United States” just three months later on October 19. By then the real life terminator, officially credited with killing 240 German enemy soldiers, had already completed filming of director John Huston’s “The Red Badge of Courage.” Image Credit: The Eva Dano Collection / Audie Murphy Research Foundation / Reddit / Colorization by Mads Madsen

Born the seventh of twelve children, future Hollywood cowboy Audie Murphy grew up dirt poor picking cotton on a sharecropper’s farm in Hunt County, Texas. His mother Josie loved to take her family to the First Baptist Church in Farmersville where she played piano. Murphy had to quit school after the eighth grade so he could help raise his brothers and sisters after Josie passed away. His father walking…