Steve McQueen took a major part of his life — In step with passionate wordsmith Andrew Antoniades

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Andrew Antoniades, a London accountant by day and the co-author of the skillfully crafted 492-page coffee table book “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films,” unearths his driving passion for the King of Cool in a fascinating, exclusive profile. McQueen’s 1,000-watt smile permeates the chiseled star’s characterization of Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Jake Holman in director Robert Wise’s “The Sand Pebbles,” distributed to robust box office receipts on December 20, 1966. The King of Cool deservedly received his sole Oscar nomination but lost to Paul Scofield in “A Man for All Seasons.” Image Credit: 20th Century Fox / Redford McQueen and Newman Tumblr
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Mistakenly sentenced to life on Devil’s Island for murdering a pimp, safe cracker Henri Charrière experiences a sadistic guard’s billy club when he pokes his head outside solitary confinement at the 1930s-era French Guiana prison. Steve McQueen’s bravura, gut-wrenching performance as “Papillon” shocked Hollywood insiders when it did not garner Oscar consideration upon its December 16, 1973, premiere in New York City, although the Golden Globes rightly nominated the King of Cool. Image Credit: Warner Bros. / Taste of Cinema / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”

The Andrew Antoniades / Steve McQueen Interview

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The cover of the definitive 492-page coffee table tome, “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films,” co-written by Andrew Antoniades and Mike Siegel and distributed on December 15, 2011. Image courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing
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Circa April 14, 1968, a rare shot clearly shows Steve McQueen behind the wheel of the Ford Mustang immortalized in director Peter Yates’ action-packed “Bullitt.” Image Credit: Warner Bros. / Courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”
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Director-writer Mike Siegel proudly holds Ernest Borgnine’s Oscar from 1955’s “Marty” inside the legendary tough guy’s Beverly Hills, California estate, in December 2002. Borgnine, who valiantly portrayed outlaw Dutch Engstrom in director Sam Peckinpah’s “The Wild Bunch,” finally agreed to an on-camera interview for Siegel’s celebrated 2005 documentary, “Passion & Poetry: The Ballad of Sam Peckinpah.” Image Credit: The Mike Siegel Collection / Amazon
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Steve McQueen is caught casually carrying a coffee cup in a rare color photo taken on the set of “Baby the Rain Must Fall” in Southeast Texas. The underwhelming drama was released to theaters on January 15, 1965. Image Credit: Sony Pictures Entertainment / Courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”
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Steve McQueen and soon-to-be second wife Ali MacGraw wash hands together in a nondescript bathroom between takes of director Sam Peckinpah’s “The Getaway,” a grand slam at the box office when distributed on December 19, 1972. Photography by Mel Traxel / Warner Bros. / Courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”
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Captain Virgil “The Cooler King” Hilts is placed in solitary confinement but refuses to be defeated, defiantly tossing his baseball in director John Sturges’ epic “The Great Escape,” released to widespread acclaim on Independence Day 1963. Photography by Lothar Winkler / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”
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Andrew Antoniades, first-time author of the unabashed labor of love that is “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films,” poses along a gorgeous English countryside lake in 2011. Image courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”
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Steve McQueen is the consummate raconteur to two teenagers between takes of 1968’s “Bullitt” on location in San Francisco. The King of Cool possessed a unique kinship with kids, perhaps remembering how tough his own upbringing was. Image Credit: Warner Bros. / Courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing / appears in “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films”
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The back and front cover of “Steve McQueen: The Actor and His Films,” a massive coffee-table tome co-written by Andrew Antoniades and Mike Siegel and published on December 15, 2011. Both images of the King of Cool are taken from his 15th film, director Henry Hathaway’s “Nevada Smith.” Image courtesy of Dalton Watson Fine Publishing
Check out “The Complete Steve McQueen Film Tribute,” published exclusively to YouTube on April 27, 2009. Video clips, music, and pictures clearly epitomize the King of Cool’s astounding journey. Video Credit: Henry Brubaker

Retro pop culture interviews & lovin’ someone fierce sustain this University of Georgia Master of Agricultural Leadership alum. Email: jeremylr@windstream.net

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