Just myself and a guitar: Funny shenanigans with ‘Spiders and Snakes’ song architect Jim Stafford

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Jim Stafford holds nothing back as he dishes about playing in the Legends with future Byrd Gram Parsons and “Me and You and a Dog Named Boo” troubadour Lobo, meeting Jerry Reed and Chet Atkins in Nashville, working with Monkee Michael Nesmith in “Television Parts,” conquering stage fright, the art of being funny, why he decided to concentrate on Branson, and rediscovering his acoustic guitar roots at the Florida Folk Festival. Seen here a playful, good-looking Stafford is ready for a steamy night in polyester-ridden Hollywood in this circa 1976 candid. Photography by Ralph Dominguez / Globe Photos
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“I get up every day and look forward to sitting down with my guitar — whether I’m writing a song or working out an instrumental. I still have the same love for it that I had back when I started playing at 12 years old.” Singer-songwriter Jim Stafford pictured in 2015. Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Theatre

The Jim Stafford Interview, Part Two

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“For the convenience of our fair patrons: Please no smoking permitted in building.” Jim Stafford’s humor-laden anarchist streak is on full display in this circa 1974 candid taken during the artist’s hot songwriting phase at the top of the charts. Photography by James Byous / WeddingSavannah.com
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Zany high jinks and cow patties imbue Branson singer-songwriter Jim Stafford circa 2013. Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Collection
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Circa 1974, singer-songwriter-comedian Jim Stafford is captured during a variety show telecast, a moment when the artist was reveling in the quadruple fame wave generated by “Swamp Witch,” “Spiders and Snakes,” “My Girl, Bill,” and “Wildwood Weed.” Photography by Brian Wolff / Globe
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Natural born entertainer Jim Stafford dons a black cowboy hat and acoustic guitar onstage in Branson circa 2013. Stafford debuted “Cow Patti” in the 1980 blockbuster Clint Eastwood comedy “Any Which Way You Can,” a sequel to “Every Which Way but Loose.” Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Collection
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Singer-songwriter-comedian Jim Stafford of “Spiders and Snakes” fame examines a guitar chord played by “Mr. Guitar,” otherwise known as Nashville session ace-producer-instrumentalist Chet Atkins, circa 1990. Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Collection
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The cover of Jerry Reed’s obscure “Lookin’ at You” album, released in August 1986 on Capitol Records. Image Credit: Amoeba Music
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Don’t you dare mess with host Jim Stafford and his ferocious-looking tiger aka “kitty” in this press photo promoting ABC’s reality series “Those Amazing Animals” circa August 5, 1980. Stafford also scored pop hits like “Your Bulldog Drinks Champagne.” Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Collection
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The Legends were a loose group of Winter Haven, Florida area musicians who played teen centers, sock hops, teen clubs and battles of the bands from roughly 1961 to 1963. From left to right are Jim Stafford (lead guitar), Bill Waldrup (bass and vocals), Lamar Braxton (drums), and Gram Parsons (lead vocal and rhythm guitar). Image Credit: Southern Garage Bands
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Jim Stafford, workin’ man: A vintage late 1978 advertisement from a trade magazine encourages readers to sample the “Swamp Witch” singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist’s concert schedule. Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Collection
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“No More Monkee Business: Michael Nesmith, Executive:” The September 1986 cover of ‘Music Connection’ magazine featuring the former Monkee. The image was used to promote ‘Television Parts’ during the previous summer. Image Credit: Courtesy of Jeff Gehringer / Monkees Live Almanac / Music Connection Inc.
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Tommy Smothers, singer Jim Stafford, and Wrecking Crew guitar legend-singer Glen Campbell are captured inside Stafford’s Branson dressing room, circa 2008. Stafford wrote numerous comedy routines for the Smothers Brothers. Image Credit: The Jim Stafford Collection
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The July 27-August 2, 1975 issue of TV Week, published by the Boston Globe newspaper, finds Jim Stafford on the cover publicizing his brief summer variety replacement series for ABC, “The Jim Stafford Show.” Image Credit: National Association of Music Merchants

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Retro pop culture interviews & lovin’ someone fierce sustain this University of Georgia Master of Agricultural Leadership alum. Email: jeremylr@windstream.net

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