‘Day of the Evil Gun,’ Glenn Ford’s best latter-day Western

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A criminally neglected Western deserving far greater notoriety is 1968’s “Day of the Evil Gun,” a downbeat, unusually brutal film starring Glenn Ford and five-time Oscar nominee Arthur Kennedy. Read on for a detailed review. Seen here as the conflicted, prodigal gunslinger Lorn Warfield, Ford is captured brandishing a six gun in “Day of the Evil Gun,” distributed to theaters on March 1, 1968. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / The Red List
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Glenn Ford expertly breathes life into prodigal gunslinger Lorn Warfield, a misunderstood, rugged individual seeking redemption in “Day of the Evil Gun.” Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
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Glenn Ford has renounced his violent past and wants to rekindle his marriage, but mild mannered rancher turned bloodthirsty gunslinger Arthur Kennedy loves Ford’s wife too in the heart-stopping finale of “Day of the Evil Gun,” released on March 1, 1968. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Archive Photos / Getty Images
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After an expertly choreographed river fistfight, adversaries Glenn Ford and Arthur Kennedy realize they should join forces as Apaches swiftly approach in “Day of the Evil Gun,” a gritty 1968 Western filmed in Durango and Torreón, Mexico. Image Credit: MGM / Western Movies Forum
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Glenn Ford gets into one nefarious scrape after another as Confederate renegade John Anderson — actually it’s his stunt double taking the spectacular fall — tries to overpower him in “Day of the Evil Gun,” a gritty Western dropped on March 1, 1968. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Archive Photos / Getty Images
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Revered gunslinger Lorn Warfield, portrayed by the always reliable Glenn Ford, shuns his six gun as he meets Pilar Pellicer in “Day of the Evil Gun,” a gritty Western filmed on location in Durango and Torreón, Mexico, and released on March 1, 1968. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Western Movies Forum
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Glenn Ford must outwit rifle-brandishing bandido Nico Minardos in “Day of the Evil Gun,” a gritty Western filmed on location in Durango and Torreón, Mexico, directed by Jerry Thorpe, and released on March 1, 1968. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Western Movies Forum
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Arthur Kennedy and Glenn Ford have wound up with a raw deal as a band of marauding Apaches have staked them out in the desert to die in “Day of the Evil Gun,” a 1968 Western filmed in Durango and Torreón, Mexico and directed by Jerry Thorpe. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer / Flickr
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The highly sensationalized theatrical poster borrowed for the DVD cover of “Day of the Evil Gun,” a character-driven, critically underappreciated 1968 Western starring Glenn Ford and Arthur Kennedy and released by Warner Archive’s manufactured on demand program on February 9, 2012. The poster designer did a poor job in capturing Ford and Kennedy’s likenesses, not even getting their costumes accurate. Barbara Babcock, evocatively tied to a stake, appears for only seconds in the finished film. Image Credit: Warner Archive
Watch gunslinger Lorn Warfield [Glenn Ford] and needling adversary, rancher Owen Forbes [Arthur Kennedy], engage in a thrilling, expertly choreographed fistfight involving a rocky river in “Day of the Evil Gun,” ably directed by Jerry Thorpe and unleashed theatrically on March 1, 1968. Video Credit: Warner Archive

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Retro pop culture interviews & lovin’ someone fierce sustain this University of Georgia Master of Agricultural Leadership alum. Email: jeremylr@windstream.net

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