Arms full of empty: On borrowed time with Inger Stevens

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Photography by Harry Warnecke or Gus Schoenbaechler / eBay / WorthPoint
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Mirror, mirror on the wall, Inger Stevens is hands down the fairest of them all: Stevens is seen on the set of director Ranald MacDougall’s “The World, The Flesh, and The Devil,” a racially charged soap opera issued on April 23, 1959. Portraying Sarah Crandall in a post-nuclear destruction New York City, Stevens tentatively finds herself in a lopsided love triangle with Harry Belafonte and Mel Ferrer. Image Credit: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
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Just before he struck box office bonanza as the director of John Wayne’s Oscar-winning “True Grit,” Henry Hathaway helmed “5 Card Stud,” a listless whodunit western distributed on July 12, 1968. Starring Dean Martin, Robert Mitchum, Roddy McDowall, and Inger Stevens in a wasted role as a beautician possessing a heart of gold, the alluring blonde actress’s previous western, “Hang ’Em High” with Clint Eastwood, is a marked improvement. Stevens incidentally had brief affairs with Martin and Eastwood. Image Credit: Paramount Pictures
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The grass isn’t always greener on the other side: Envious of neighbor Robert Morse’s perpetual philandering after 12 years of domestic bliss, Walter Matthau finds companionship in a book while unsuspecting wife Inger Stevens provocatively exercises on a separate bed in dance maestro turned director Gene Kelly’s “A Guide for the Married Man,” a hilarious box office hit issued on May 26, 1967. Image Credit: 20th Century Fox
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A German lobby card depicts perspiring missionary Emily Biddle [Inger Stevens] finally being reunited with boyfriend-Yankee cavalry major Tom Wolcott [Glenn Ford] after being captured by escaping Confederate prisoners in “A Time For Killing.” Directed by the generally reliable action-oriented Phil Karlson [e.g. the 1973 blockbuster “Walking Tall” about real life Tennessee Sheriff Buford Pusser] after cult icon Roger Corman was abruptly dismissed, the underwhelming western was distributed by Columbia on November 1, 1967. Image Credit: Cinematographer Kenneth Peach / Columbia Pictures

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Retro pop culture interviews & lovin’ someone fierce sustain this University of Georgia Master of Agricultural Leadership alum. Email: jeremylr@windstream.net

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