A registered nurse unshackles Bruce Lee’s demise

An engaging interview finds “The Death of Bruce Lee: A Clinical Investigation” author Duncan McKenzie convinced that an allergic reaction to aspirin felled the soaring 32-year-old “Enter the Dragon” warrior and not a heatstroke as proposed by “Bruce Lee: A Life” scribe Matthew Polly.

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Photography by Dave Friedman / Warner Bros. / Bruce Lee’s official Facebook

The Duncan McKenzie Interview

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Slightly weary 18-year-old Duncan McKenzie after a round of intense medical training in 1973. McKenzie attended nursing school at Fairfield, a large hospital dating from the 1800's ultimately decommissioned in the 1990's, in Bedfordshire, England. Image Credit: Courtesy of Duncan McKenzie
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Bruce Lee, circa 1946 as a six-year-old when he would have starred in his first movie, “The Birth of Mankind.” Matthew Polly explains in “Bruce Lee: A Life” that Bruce rendered “a runaway boy who becomes a pickpocket and is run over by a truck in the Cantonese tearjerker. A forgettable flick that flopped at the box office, it is only notable for typecasting young Bruce as a tough, wily street urchin with a heart of gold, a kind of Artful Dodger. It was a character he would play repeatedly for the rest of his childhood acting career.” Image Credit: The Hong Kong Heritage Museum / Courtesy of Matthew Polly
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Left Image Credit: The Tom Bleecker Collection; Right Image Credit: Photography by Dave Friedman [official “Enter the Dragon” still photographer] / Warner Bros. / Simon & Schuster / Courtesy of Matthew Polly
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Image Credit: Bruce Lee’s official Facebook
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Image Credit: Bruce Lee’s official Facebook
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Trusted confidant Dan Inosanto grimaces as he attempts to keep the heavy punching bag stationary against a determined Bruce Lee circa 1968. Despite being right-handed, Lee preferred to strike as a southpaw because he surmised that “due to the rapid and unpredictable nature of self-defense, you should have your strong arm at the front where it can react the quickest.” Image Credit: The David Tadman Collection / Courtesy of Matthew Polly
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Betty Ting Pei was signed to Shaw Brothers Studio in 1967 and remained part of the Golden Harvest arch rival’s acting stable for the next six years. Image Credit: The Julius Khang Collection / MEMORI TAHUN 70–80an Facebook group / Clear Water Bay Land Company Limited
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Hong Kong actors Samuel Hui [also a singer-songwriter], Unicorn Chan, Betty Ting Pei, Bruce Lee, and Patrick Tse in 1972 around the time of Lee’s directorial debut, “The Way of the Dragon,” best known for the kung fu icon’s spirited battle with Chuck Norris in the Roman Colosseum. Image Credit: Pinterest user Glenn Johnson
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Melbourne, Australia-based registered nurse Duncan McKenzie assuredly exhibits debut tome “The Death of Bruce Lee: A Clinical Investigation” on May 24, 2020. Image Credit: Courtesy of Duncan McKenzie

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Retro pop culture interviews & lovin’ someone fierce sustain this University of Georgia Master of Agricultural Leadership alum. Email: jeremylr@windstream.net

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